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Hollandsche Schouwburg

The Hollandsche Schouwburg was used by the German occupiers during World War II as the place where Jews had to report. Tens of thousands of women and men were deported from here to concentration and extermination camps. Today it is a memorial site.

About the Hollandsche Schouwburg

The Hollandsche Schouwburg is currently temporarily closed for renovations. This former theatre was used by the German occupiers during World War II to hold tens of thousands of Jews before their deportation.⁠ Tens of thousands of women and men were deported from here to concentration and extermination camps. After the war, the theatre became a place of remembrance and reflection.

Reopening 2024

At the beginning of 2024, the Hollandsche Schouwburg will reopen as a memorial site. Voices of people who were persecuted and murdered and of those who survived guide the visitor around. They talk about the theatre in the years before, during and after the war. A new work of art enhances the visitor experience at this charged place of memory.⁠

The National Holocaust Museum will also open its doors in early 2024. The museum will be located across the street from the Hollandsche Schouwburg, in the building of the former Reformed Kweekschool, at Plantage Middenlaan 27

Read here why it is important that the National Holocaust Museum is established and how you can be involved.

The Hollandsche Schouwburg, together with the National Holocaust Museum, the Portuguese Synagogue, the Jewish Museum and the Jewish Museum Junior, is part of the Jewish Cultural Quarter.

Accessibility

See how the Hollandsche Schouwburg makes visits accessible for people with disabilities.

More information