Voting pass information

With a voting pass for the City Council election you can vote in any of the polling stations in Amsterdam. With a voting pass for the District Committee election, you can only vote at a polling station within the city district in which you live. You will not be allowed to vote without the voting pass that has your name printed on it.

Has your voting pass not arrived or have you misplaced it?

If you have not received a voting pass by 3 March, or if you have misplaced your voting pass, you can request a replacement. This can be done in person at the Civil Affairs department of any city district office until 12:00 on 18 March (please be sure to take a valid identity document with you). If you wish to apply for a replacement voting pass in writing, the Civil Registry (Dienst Basisinformatie, DBI) must receive your request no later than 14 March 2014.

Identity document

When voting on 19 March 2014, alongside your voting pass, you will be required to show a valid identity document.

Valid Dutch identity documents include:

  • Passport
  • Identity card
  • Driving licence

Non-Dutch citizens can identify themselves with the following identity documents:

  • a passport issued by an EU member state*
  • an identity card issued by an EU member state*
  • a driving licence issued by an EU member state*
  • a residence permit issued by the Netherlands
  • a privileged person's identity documents issued by the Netherlands

*EU member states include Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland

Non-EU citizens need to show their residence permit (a national identity card is not sufficient).

Do you not have a valid identity document?

You have three options:

  • You can apply for a new identity document at the Civil Affairs department of any District Office. This typically takes five working days to process. You can also submit an application with urgency. For an 'urgent' application you will need to pay an ''express' fee.
  • You can submit a written request to authorise someone else to vote on your behalf ('by proxy'). With the proper authorisation, someone else can cast your vote for you without his or her needing to show your identity document. The Civil Registry must receive your written request to authorise a proxy voter no later than 14 March 2014.
  • You can identify yourself at the polling station with a copy of the official police report (in case your identity document was stolen) or an official statement regarding your missing or damaged travel document or driving licence (in case your identity document is missing or damaged) in combination with some other document that shows your name and a passport-type photo (e.g. a senior-citizen pass, an annual NS train pass, or a library card). This option is intended for those for whom it is too late to apply for a new identity document.

Voting by proxy

If you are unable to visit a polling station on election day you can have someone else cast your vote for you. You will need to arrange for a proxy voter in advance. There are two ways that you can authorise someone else to vote on your behalf: by authorising a proxy voter directly on your voting pass or by submitting a written request for proxy voter authorisation.

Authorising a proxy voter on your voting pass

This form of authorisation is only possible if the person who will be voting on your behalf (i.e. the proxy) is also a registered resident of Amsterdam who will be voting in Amsterdam. For the District Committee election, your proxy must also be eligible to vote for the same District Committee as you.

How it works:

  • You can directly authorise your own proxy up until the day of the elections itself (19 March 2014).
  • On the back of your voting pass you will find a form for proxy authorisation (volmachtbewijs). Fill in the name of the person you would like to authorise as your proxy and then sign the form.
  • Have the person whom you would like to have vote on your behalf also place their signature.
  • Give your proxy a copy of your identity document to take with them. They will need to show that at the polling station.
  • As the one who authorised the proxy directly, you are allowed to revoke that authorisation up until the moment they vote.
  • Please note: you may not authorise someone else to vote on your behalf while you are at the polling station by filling in the proxy authorisation form on your voting pass then and there.

Submitting a written request for proxy authorisation

If you submit a written request for proxy authorisation, your proxy will receive a separate proof of authorisation by post. For the City Council election you can only appoint someone who is eligible to vote in Amsterdam. For the District Committee election, you can only appoint someone who lives in the same city district as you. Even if you do not have a valid identity document yourself, you can still submit a written request for proxy authorisation.

How it works:

  • Download the application form for proxy authorisation (volmachtbewijs) from www.amsterdam.nl/verkiezingen. You can also pick up the form at any district office in Amsterdam or request the Elections Office of the Civil Registry to send one.
  • Fill in your name, address and date of birth on the form. Do the same for the person whom you wish to authorise as your proxy.
  • Sign the form and have the authorised proxy voter sign it as well.
  • Send the completed form to the Elections Office of the Civil Registry. The Civil Registry must receive your form no later than 14 March 2014.
  • If your request for authorisation is approved, your proxy will receive a proof of authorisation by post approximately one week before the elections.
  • It is not possible to revoke a proxy authorisation that was requested in writing.
  • It is also no longer possible for you to cast your own vote once you have authorised someone to vote on your behalf. That would be a punishable offence.

Important information regarding the authorised proxy voter

The person who will vote on your behalf must do so at the same time that they cast their own vote. The voting may not happen on two different occasions. An authorised proxy voter can vote for at most two other people per election besides themselves.